3 John: being hospitable

This letter is addressed to a particular recipient, a man named Gaius. This letter to serves to encourage Gaius in what he is doing and to commend him in his role is supporting the wider church.

Whereas 2 John warns against letting false teachers stay in the believers’ homes, this letter praises Gaius for his hospitality towards genuine teachers. Gaius is contrasted against a man called Diotrephes. Diotrephes seems controlling, overbearing and power-hungry. He is not welcoming to travelling teachers.

I suppose the lesson in this letter, who would you rather be: Gaius or Diotrephes. Gaius is remembered for putting others’ needs before his, for opening his home up and accepting fellow believers. He often, it seems, opens his home to those who he has never met before. I’m sure that wasn’t an easy decision, as it can open yourself to being vulnerable. (I imagine it could have been even riskier in those times.) Diotrephes, as verse nine tells us, “loves to be first”. Therefore, he seems to spread rumours about other authority figures and refuse to welcome them.

Of course, we answer, I want to be Gaius! But do our lives actually reflect that? Are we sometimes eager to cling onto our power or reputation? Are we intimidated of those that might be seen as better than us? Do we belittle others in order to bolster our ego and reputation? Or, are we open handed and hospitable? Do we welcome travellers and strangers into our homes? Do we put the needs, reputations and honour of others before ourselves? I wonder what the church would look like if everybody followed this better example.

1 John 4: God is love so we should love

This chapter seems a bit repetitive. However, these are truths that we need to know completely and fully. We need to know that God is love, and to be in God is to love one another.

The first part of the chapter carries on from 1 John 3. It talks about how denying Christ is the sign of a false prophet. Jesus, as one person of the triune God, came as fully God and fully man to the earth to save us and reconcile us with God. If someone denies the wonders of these truths, they do not speak the truth.

Then verses 7-21 reiterate some simple ideas. It tells us God is love twice; that God loves us three times, and discusses loving our brothers and sisters about four times. Verses 9-11 sum it up like this:

This is how God showed his love among us: He sent his one and only Son into the world that we might live through him. This is love: not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son as an atoning sacrifice for our sins. Dear friends, since God so loved us, we also ought to love one another.

These truths are amazing and are worth repeating. God, who is love, loved us by giving us life through the atoning sacrifice of his son Jesus Christ. As we dwell in the truth of such love, we are to be filled with this love. The evidence of God’s love in our life is, funnily enough, the amount of love in our life. As the love that God showed was immeasurably generous, so should our love for others.

I’m often amazed at the testimony of new believers, especially in Cambodia. It is often the love they experienced from believers that testified to the truth of God’s love for them. Therefore, it is so important that we testify of Lord Jesus in our words and also in how we show love for others.

Today, I was really challenged because someone (who I think has a lot of wisdom) said that the idea of “friendship evangelism” was wrong. I agree. Or just that it’s tautological. If you love your friends and if you also believe that the best thing for someone’s eternal soul was for them to know Jesus, then you’d naturally tell them about Jesus. If you don’t, then either you don’t love your friend or you don’t believe in the gospel. That was a bitter pill to swallow and I know I have a lot of repentance to do, either for being an unloving friend or being an unfaithful disciple.

1 Timothy 5

This chapter looks at how to look after others within the church. First, it tells us to be gentle when dealing with older men within the church – treating them with the same respect as we are to treat our fathers. Then older women are to be treated as mothers, and younger men and women as brother and sisters. Of course, the church is to be a family of Christ, so we need to actually act that way.

While the majority of the section is focused on the treatment of widows, and how they should behave, there are wider applications from it. First, that the serving of the Lord and doing good deeds is important; these good deeds include the raising of a family. Also, you need to look after your households, or those that have been put in your care by the Lord. This, of course, includes family members (parents, grandparents, etc.), but can also, I think, be extended to other people you share your lives with. In verse 16, it talks about when women have widows in their care. This could be widowed relatives (mother-in-law, etc.) but it sounds like something distinct from verse 8, as this type of relationship has already been mentioned.

We are also to treat church elders with a double honour, because of the work that they do. If they do something wrong, we are to rebuke them, but there is also a public element to this. I think this is to be done in the context of the church family you are in, rather than publicly. We need to take rebuking people serious, but also thoughtfully. I think twitter has led us to be quick to anger and slow to praise, which is the opposite of God’s character.

Verse 22 is somewhat confusing: “Do not be hasty in the laying on of hands, and do not share in the sins of others. Keep yourself pure.” This is probably one for further study. (Another one on my list of “Biblical things I don’t understand.”)

Verse 23 seems exciting, and seems to tell us to drink wine. Of course, that’s because wine was more sterile than water in those days, and was also often weaker.

The final two verses are a warning and an encouragement: your deeds will be noticed – good and bad; so you need to choose which type of deed you want to be seen for!