2 Timothy 2

Again, this chapter tells us that we are to be strong, but the source of our strength is not within ourselves, but in the grace of Jesus. Paul provides three examples of what it means to be strong in the power of grace, using the analogies of a soldier, athlete and farmer.

The first example tells us to embrace suffering, not to get entangled in civilian affairs and to be a soldier for Christ. Again this begs the question of what it means by civilian affairs. Where do we put our focus and what are we to ignore and not be distracted by? What counts as civilian affairs? It does tell us that we are to be single-minded and to only seek our general’s pleasure. Therefore, whatever we do, we do it to glorify God.

The athlete analogy again shows strength, endurance and hard-work, but within a set of rules. These rules are to show us that we are to be obedient to the word and to the commands of Christ Jesus.

The final example of the farmer suggests the fruitfulness of pursuing God’s purpose. By living within the will of God, we will receive his promises.

Then Paul reminds Timothy of Jesus’ death and resurrection, to encourage him to share in this suffering for the gospel. He also mentions his own suffering, that was endured in the pursuit of fulfilling this gospel. Verses 11-13 tells us that if we die and endure in Christ, we live and reign in his resurrection power. However, he we disown him, we, too are disowned.

The final part of this chapter shows how Timothy is to focus on the word of God and avoid quarrels and Godless chatter. He is to be kind and gentle, even in his rebukes. Then, Timothy can present himself as someone who is not ashamed of the gospel he has heard.

1 Thessalonians 4 and 5

Both chapters 4 and 5 of 1 Thessalonians are relatively short, so I decided to combine them. Also, I need to make up for lost time, as I slid off the wagon for a week or so. Many people’s lives have been turned upside. My change in routine has been minimal, which has been enough to sideline my Bible-reading habits. But I will press on.

Verse 1 and 2 of chapter 4 asks the Thessalonians to do more of the same. They’re doing the right things, so Paul simply tells them to do it more and more. I pray that I can do the right things more and more as well. Hopefully, as I do the right things more, it’ll crowd out the opportunities to get it wrong.

Verse 3 says that it is God’s will that we are sanctified. One (correct) reading of this is that we should be obedient to this. However, it also reminds me that God is on my side with this – he wants it to happen and will make it happen if I cooperate and submit myself to him. Therefore, let God’s will be done!

Our purity is rather significant, because we should pursue it and “anyone who rejects this instruction does not reject a human being but God, the very God who gives you his Holy Spirit.” This is somewhat trouble and a good reminder of what disobedience to his word actually is. It is an unwillingness to accept God and a desire to reject him.

Verse 11 is somewhat interesting too, especially in the light of megachurch pastors and Christian “celebrities”. God calls us to have a quiet life. Not an outrageous and a loud life. That’s something interesting to think about. It is this that wins the respect of outsiders, not the loud trumpet call and the soap-box evangelism. There is (probably) a place for this and a Biblical reasoning. I’ve yet to wrestle with this idea further. (This is something I love about reading the Bible: when you don’t actually know what it fully entails or means. It just fires up my curiosity.)

The last section of chapter 4 is about believers that have died. These words were meant to be an encouragement to those in Thessalonica. However, they can be an encouragement to us now, especially with the global tragedy of coronavirus.

Chapter 5, again, is relevant to today, but perhaps less encouraging. It talks about how suddenly destruction can come. Christians, however, are to be sober, thoughtful and proactive, even during times of suffering and even on the Day of the Lord.

The final instructions are helpful reminders of what to do, especially during the coronavirus outbreak as well:

  • warn the idle and disruptive,
  • encourage others,
  • help the weak,
  • be patient with everyone,
  • strive to do what is good for everyone,
  • rejoice always,
  • pray continuously,
  • give thanks in all circumstances.

And as we do this, may the grace of God be with us.

Stay safe.