1 John 5: the Holy Spirit’s testimony

This chapter repeats a lot of the same ideas of the whole book but also introduces some new ones. A few of these I do not fully understand and might have some symbolic significance I’m not that familiar with.

The first statement is that we need to believe that Jesus is the Messiah: the one that was sent to save us and God’s people. This means that we know God. Another aspect of loving God is our obedience to God. I love what verse 2 and 4 tells us about God’s commands. They tell us that they are not burdensome but help us to overcome the world. Through following the Lord’s commands we get to be free as we are released from the burdens of this life in the world. If you are wondering why we need to overcome the world the chapter answers this for us. Verse 19, a little bit further down warns us the whole world is under the rule of the evil one. But through the victory of Jesus, we can have victory too.

This chapter also tells us about how we come to believe. It is never through hearing a person explain the gospel that we come to believe. It is in fact through the testimony of the Holy Spirit. (There’s also the testimony of water and blood, which confuses me. I assume the blood is the death on the cross, as remembered in communion. The water part stumps me and could me baptism or refer to a particular moment after Jesus died. That’s one for research.) The Holy Spirit, being one person in the triune God prepares our hearts and ears to hear and receive the truth. Without the Holy Spirit’s testimony no one can believe. Often people think they are under pressure to convert non-believers, but in reality there is nothing of the sort. Instead, we just have to be obedient to God’s life giving commands.

Once we have accepted the Holy Spirit’s testimony about Jesus, we are one with Christ. This means that we are given eternal life (verses 11-13). We are also able to pray for things, in accordance with God’s will, and know that God hears our prayers. We are also protected by God who prevents us from sinning. There is also the role of the body of the church in helping lead us to repentance when we sin. But once again, only God can transform the heart of humans.

1 John 4: God is love so we should love

This chapter seems a bit repetitive. However, these are truths that we need to know completely and fully. We need to know that God is love, and to be in God is to love one another.

The first part of the chapter carries on from 1 John 3. It talks about how denying Christ is the sign of a false prophet. Jesus, as one person of the triune God, came as fully God and fully man to the earth to save us and reconcile us with God. If someone denies the wonders of these truths, they do not speak the truth.

Then verses 7-21 reiterate some simple ideas. It tells us God is love twice; that God loves us three times, and discusses loving our brothers and sisters about four times. Verses 9-11 sum it up like this:

This is how God showed his love among us: He sent his one and only Son into the world that we might live through him. This is love: not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son as an atoning sacrifice for our sins. Dear friends, since God so loved us, we also ought to love one another.

These truths are amazing and are worth repeating. God, who is love, loved us by giving us life through the atoning sacrifice of his son Jesus Christ. As we dwell in the truth of such love, we are to be filled with this love. The evidence of God’s love in our life is, funnily enough, the amount of love in our life. As the love that God showed was immeasurably generous, so should our love for others.

I’m often amazed at the testimony of new believers, especially in Cambodia. It is often the love they experienced from believers that testified to the truth of God’s love for them. Therefore, it is so important that we testify of Lord Jesus in our words and also in how we show love for others.

Today, I was really challenged because someone (who I think has a lot of wisdom) said that the idea of “friendship evangelism” was wrong. I agree. Or just that it’s tautological. If you love your friends and if you also believe that the best thing for someone’s eternal soul was for them to know Jesus, then you’d naturally tell them about Jesus. If you don’t, then either you don’t love your friend or you don’t believe in the gospel. That was a bitter pill to swallow and I know I have a lot of repentance to do, either for being an unloving friend or being an unfaithful disciple.

1 John 3: child of God

Sometimes when I read a passage, I just want to copy and paste everything here. The words are so encouraging, striking or beautiful. The first two verses are just great. They remind us of our status as children of God, because of his great love. Then it speaks to what we will become when Jesus returns; we will become like him.

John then goes on to remind us that we are not to continue sinning because we are in Christ. Sin is of the devil, for he is the original sinner. (Not Adam and Eve!) But we are born of God, being his children, so we no longer have sin in us. Again, this holds in tension the now and not-yet aspect of the Gospel. However, transformative change is possible and God does work in our hearts.

We are also to love our brothers and sisters. This is not because of how we are treated or because those around it deserve it. In fact, we should expect to be hated. We love despite this and because of God’s great love.

Loving others is a command from Christ and is in obedience to God. Again, it brings together the two-fold aspect of the greatest commandment: love the Lord your God and love your neighbour. You cannot do one without the other.

1 John 2: being without sin

This chapter picks up where the previous one picks up: in the tension of being a sinful but also redeemed. Here it reminds us that we should not sin but that we also have Jesus to rely on. It reminds me a bit of when Peter writes about how God provided everything but invites us to have a role. We often try too hard to rely on our own strength to reach purity, but the fact is we can only have it because God redeemed us through his son Jesus Christ. Our human efforts do nothing; it’s only through the cross and the good work Jesus is doing in us that we can achieve anything.

Verses 3 to 6 expand on us further. We are to keep Jesus’ commands out of love for him. Therefore, it’s so important to daily focus on him and what he did for us to motivate us. In times of trouble or temptation we look not to ourselves or our own strength but we look to the cross. Then we can love the Lord our God with all our heart, soul, mind and strength.

The next part of John looks at another way the love for our Lord is express: our love for others. It’s not coincidence that Jesus responded to the question about the greatest commandment with a twofold answer. We are to love our God, which is expressed here in how we love others. These verses also remind us of how Jesus said in Matthew 5. You can’t offer worship if you know a brother has something against you. Jesus came to redeem us with God and each other. Therefore, if there are relational issues within the church, we aren’t living in the fullness of Christ’s redemption.

Verses 12-14 are interesting, exciting and encouraging. The fact that we are told that we have overcome the evil one is an interesting concept in the fight against sin. As we battle against evil desires, we must remember: the victory is won! That’s another good reason to look toward the cross.

The last sections talk about not loving the world because it is temporary and to love what God has given you. We are also warned not to deny Christ. We are to remain in him and remain confident in his promises. In that way we can be pure when he comes again.

1 John 1: the Word of life; the light and the tension of now and not yet

This first chapter is pretty short and punchy. (Which is good because I left this very late in the day!) It is only ten verses long; however, John still manages to fit in quite a number of theology truths and complexities.

John doesn’t reveal explicitly what or whom he is talking about. He reveals a number of facts about the topic:

  • it existed since the beginning (here, the beginning of time);
  • John (and others) have observed and touched it: it is present in the world and it is tangible;
  • it is connected to the concept of the Word of life;
  • it appeared to us;
  • it is one with the Father;
  • the proclamation results in fellowship between the hearers;
  • this fellowship is with God and Jesus.

Of course, if we know our scripture and the beginning of the Gospel of John we know what, or rather who, the topic is. It is Jesus.

In fact, the parallels between John 1 and 1 John 1 are pretty obvious.

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was with God in the beginning. Through him all things were made; without him nothing was made that has been made. In him was life, and that life was the light of all mankind. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it… The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth.

John 1:1-5, 14

Here we see many of the same ideas listed above reoccurring. Even the theme of light comes later in 1 John 1.

This is the message we have heard from him and declare to you: God is light; in him there is no darkness at all.

1 John 1:5

I love John’s descriptions of Jesus. It makes me realise how holy, marvellous and awesome Jesus is. We learn that Jesus existed since the beginning of time; John has observed and tangibly known Jesus; Jesus is the Word of life; Jesus came to us and is one with the Father. Through hearing about him we can be brought into a fellowship with other believers and, more significantly, the Father and Jesus himself.

The next part is somewhat confusing. In verse 7, we are purified of sin but in verses 8-10 we have sin. This, I think exposes the now and not yet tension of the Bible. Jesus’ work is complete; it is finished. He has forgiven our sins. But yet, Jesus also continues to do a good work in us and sanctify us. We commit to an eternal truth that will come to fullness on the day of judgment: we have no sin. But while we live on this planet, in our fallen state, we continue to fail and flounder. We have sin, yet we can constantly seek forgiveness and constantly ask Jesus to change and renew us.

Either way, for this to happen, we need to acknowledge our need for forgiveness and Jesus’ work in us. Through that process, we invite him into our lives and to indwell with us. If we do not do this, we don’t understand the crucifixion and how we are alienated from God. Therefore, we are unable to receive grace because we do not fully repent.

This is why the truth is not in us. It’s also why it concerns me that some leaders have publicly stated they do not ask for forgiveness. They do not bring God into the equation. This suggests that they are deceived and that they do not know the truth.